All in the Family: THE DYNASTIES: George W. Bush Will Accept GOP Nomination as a Personal Victory and as a Proud Chapter in His Family Tradition. His Generation Has Now Taken Control of American Politics, but Clans like the Bushes Link the New Era with the Past. an Exclusive Gallery of Republican Families

Newsweek, August 7, 2000 | Go to article overview

All in the Family: THE DYNASTIES: George W. Bush Will Accept GOP Nomination as a Personal Victory and as a Proud Chapter in His Family Tradition. His Generation Has Now Taken Control of American Politics, but Clans like the Bushes Link the New Era with the Past. an Exclusive Gallery of Republican Families


This is the milliennium election, and a changing of the guard. Gen Y now is eligible to vote in a presidential campaign, and for the first time since 1952 there is no member of the World War II generation on a national ticket. That year the grandfatherly Ike led the GOP to victory--the same year a Connecticut Yankee named Prescott Bush joined the U.S. Senate. The Bushes are now entering their fourth generation ranked among the most durable families in national politics.

Yet the Bushes are only one of the GOP clans with deep roots in public service. A family might come to politics, like the McCains, from a long military tradition. Or with politics in its blood like the Tafts, a bedrock Ohio clan that produced a president early in the last century. Two traditions came together when Howard Baker married Nancy Kassebaum. The revolutionaries named Reagan will also live on, if only in the sentimental memory of the party the Gipper built. Politics may seem out of fashion or derided as a cyncial game. But to these people--these families--public service is a noble enterprise and a life they are proud to live.

John H. Sununu and John E. Sununu

Congressman and former governor

The Sununus are a newer entry into generational politics. Father John H. (left) served three terms as New Hampshire's governor. Then he backed Vice President Bush in the state's 1988 primary. Bush won, and Sununu went to Washington as his chief of staff. John E., an engineer like his father, entered politics after Dad moved into broadcasting. The congressman is more mellow than Dad, but still as conservative.

Tim and Asa Hutchinson

Senator and congressman

Asa and Tim Hutchinson share a lot: an apartment outside D.C. and a distaste for fellow Arkansas native Bill Clinton. Asa (right), a second-term House member, was one of the managers who prosecuted Clinton. Tim, a first-term senator who is 16 months older than his brother, voted guilty on both impeachment articles. The conservatives from Gravette, Ark., attended Bob Jones University.

Judd and Hugh Gregg

Senator and former governor

The Greggs are New Hampshire's top political family. All presidential hopefuls covet their support, but they've backed the Bushes four times.

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All in the Family: THE DYNASTIES: George W. Bush Will Accept GOP Nomination as a Personal Victory and as a Proud Chapter in His Family Tradition. His Generation Has Now Taken Control of American Politics, but Clans like the Bushes Link the New Era with the Past. an Exclusive Gallery of Republican Families
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