Medical 'Masters' Find a Role Practitioners Fill Gap between Nurse, Doctor

The Florida Times Union, July 10, 2000 | Go to article overview

Medical 'Masters' Find a Role Practitioners Fill Gap between Nurse, Doctor


TORRINGTON, Conn. -- Three years ago, Mary Poll's blood pressure was dangerously high -- 180 over 104 -- but she was living on a fixed income and without health insurance and couldn't go for checkups as often as needed.

Besides, she says, the doctor never listened to her concerns.

Now, Poll keeps regular tabs on her hypertension and gets the advice she needs to keep her blood pressure down. The care comes from Kathy Grimaud, a nurse practitioner who offers the 62-year-old Poll and other seniors medical attention they can afford.

Nurse practitioners fill gaps between the more traditional roles of nurse and physician. Over the last decade, the number of nurse practitioners has doubled nationwide, and more people are seeking them out for the extra time and compassion they offer.

"A lot of patients choose nurse practitioners because they get more time," said Cheryl Zwingman-Begley, president of the Connecticut Nursing Association. "I think people see it as a plus and they get more attention."

During a recent appointment with Grimaud at the Sullivan Senior Center, Poll's blood pressure was 146 over 82. Lower than three years ago but higher than at more recent visits.

Poll told Grimaud she was probably upset because of the cost of getting her car worked on.

Grimaud instructed Poll on a breathing exercise.

"When the mechanic gives you the bill, I want you to do this," she told Poll.

Nationally, the number of nurse practitioners has increased over the last 10 years from about 30,000 to about 65,000, said Jan Towers, director of health policy for the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

Twenty-two states allow nurse practitioners to practice independently of doctors, while 19 have systems like Connecticut's, in which nurse practitioners work in collaboration with physicians rather than under their supervision. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Medical 'Masters' Find a Role Practitioners Fill Gap between Nurse, Doctor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.