It's No Myth, Classical Studies a Hot Topic

By McKinney, Eric | The Florida Times Union, June 28, 2000 | Go to article overview

It's No Myth, Classical Studies a Hot Topic


McKinney, Eric, The Florida Times Union


During the last decade, universities across the country have seen enrollment in classical studies programs reach new highs.

Most college students can't go far before bumping into classical studies, which includes various forms of ancient history and language, philosophy, anthropology and archaeology.

But this return to the classics makes for more than just interesting classroom discussions.

The number of high school students taking Latin has increased 20 percent in the past decade. Tests show those students do better on standardized tests such as the SAT.

Classical studies can even help students get a job.

When larger companies come to a college campus looking for new employees, they want someone with a broad education who is capable of reasoning and applied learning, said Lewis A. Sussman, chairman of the Classical Studies Department at the University of Florida.

It's often classical studies students who are targeted.

Sussman points out that most classical studies students minor in the subject or are getting double majors. That makes them much more marketable.

"Most people don't realize what a classical studies education does," Sussman said. "It's mostly a component of a broad liberal education. Students develop better vocabulary, reading and writing skills and a good cultural background. That makes them a very well-rounded person."

The entertainment industry also has noticed the possibilities of the classics.

TV has adapted The Odyssey and Jason and the Argonauts. And in theaters this year, Gladiator, very loosely based on ancient Roman history, opened the summer blockbuster season at the top of the box office. Macho Russell Crowe and violent gladiator duels probably had more to do with its success than did its historical underpinnings, but the ancient setting was still awesome and intriguing.

Colleges have noticed an upward trend in classical studies. UF's program is small, with just 74 students enrolled last school year. But that's more than double the 33 enrolled in it during the 1989-90 year.

More than doubling the enrollment sounds unusual, but it is common across the country. At Boston University, for example, the enrollment in 1989-1990 was 821, while in 1999-2000 it had jumped to 1,714. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It's No Myth, Classical Studies a Hot Topic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.