David Robinson

By Murphy, Claire | Marketing, June 29, 2000 | Go to article overview

David Robinson


Murphy, Claire, Marketing


This is how that rarely spotted creature, the ABC1 Consumer, lives in the 21st century. She pays [pounds]2 for take-away lattes, orders her groceries from Tesco Direct so she can devote more time to the pursuit of her ABC1 salary, and checks out news headlines regularly throughout the day via the internet, TV or her WAP phone.

The lattes may be a passing trend, but hunger for news seems to be with us to stay. Those sought-after ABC1s are characterised by their need to be in touch, to take a full part in the speeded-up merry-go-round that modern life encourages. At least that's the belief that David Robinson, ITN's head of marketing, is pinning the broadcaster's latest venture on.

ITN is to launch a 24-hour news channel, available over the internet, from WAP phones, personal organisers, as well as the rather more mundane media of TV and radio. "Advertisers want to reach these people (ABC1s) and we have the perfect vehicle to attract both the right audience and the advertisers," says Robinson.

Excellent idea. News, as any journalist will tell you, is addictive. Get people interested in the fact that they can access the latest news anywhere, and via virtually any technology, and they'll probably be hooked. Get them coming back often enough and the advertisers will be flocking through the revolving doors of ITN's glassy shopping mall-style head office.

Just one little problem -- haven't the BBC and Sky already carved up the 24-hour TV news cake in the UK? Doesn't every web portal worth its salt offer a speedily-updated news service? Isn't all this a bit, well, late?

Definitely not, says Robinson, sitting on the edge of his seat to press home the point. We are up on the second floor of the impressive Norman Foster-designed ITN building on Grays Inn Road. I try to curb a compulsion to lean over the atrium and watch Channel 4 record the news.

Robinson is the 41-year-old Aussie charged with building the profile of the ITN brand as it moves into new markets. He carefully explains why there is room for ITN's own channel in the jungle of news: "BBC and Sky are principally entertainment brands. News is a cornerstone for the BBC, but this is all that ITN does. Research has shown that people find ITN authoritative and accessible. It's that accessibility, the ability to deliver news to the mass market in a way that they feel connected with it, that will mark us out."

Viewers and listeners see and hear ITN-produced news all the time but may not know it. ITN gathers and packages news for channels including ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5, as well as for radio, with LBC News Direct. Robinson's task is to bring the ITN brand out from behind the shadows, capitalising on its skill at producing news tailored for specific audiences.

Diplomacy and sensitivity is the name of the game. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

David Robinson
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.