Districts Realize Teachers Need Teachers, Too Mentoring Programs Offer Educators Support

By Hartman, Kari | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 22, 2000 | Go to article overview

Districts Realize Teachers Need Teachers, Too Mentoring Programs Offer Educators Support


Hartman, Kari, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


It's not easy to teach people to love their jobs.

Members of all professions seem to find things to complain about - the hours, the pay, the workload.

So it's no surprise school administrators are searching for ways to help young teachers address the challenges of their new profession while developing a long-term love affair with their work.

And everyone involved in education knows that will be especially critical during the next few years.

A recent State Board of Education report indicates tens of thousands of Illinois Baby Boomers are expected to retire from teaching in the next decade.

To replace them, administrators will need to do more than just attract new teachers - they will have to figure out how to keep them happy and thriving in the profession.

And in an economic environment where it's not unusual for teachers to switch career paths or change districts in search of higher pay or other benefits, that's becoming increasingly tricky.

Indian Prairie Unit District 204 in Naperville and Aurora is a good example. It remains the fastest-growing district in the state, but a recent count indicates 182 of its 1,600 or so teachers resigned over the summer, including 116 who were with the district for three years or less. Fifty-seven of those teachers left after just one year.

"Talking informally with other personnel, people are seeing the same thing," says Nancy Pedersen, District 204's assistant superintendent for human resources.

"Teaching is looking a little bit more like private enterprise. Now teachers are shopping around a little bit more."

Research indicates money usually isn't the motivating factor in attracting candidates to teaching, Pedersen says, "but when all things in a district are equal, why not leave for more money?"

While districts grapple with how much to pay teachers to keep them from looking elsewhere, countless other factors also come into play.

New teachers, for instance, often feel overwhelmed by their workloads and uncertain of how their teaching strategies are working.

To help pull them through their first few years in front of a classroom, more districts are offering mentoring programs. The concept is simple: Experienced teachers are paired with beginners to help them through their struggles.

That's why 62 area educators participated this month in a teacher mentoring program in Addison called Pathwise Induction Into the Teaching Profession. The program is sponsored by the Educational Testing Service in conjunction with the DuPage Regional Office of Education.

Veteran teachers met for three days of training and will attend another two-day session in November to collect tips for coaching new teachers in those make-or-break first few years in the classroom.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Districts Realize Teachers Need Teachers, Too Mentoring Programs Offer Educators Support
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.