Security Measures for Sound Information Society

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), August 30, 2000 | Go to article overview

Security Measures for Sound Information Society


The following is an article contributed to a recent newsletter of the Korea Information Security Agency Ahn Chul-soo, CEO of Ahn Anti-Virus Laboratories Ltd. -- ED.

The excitement of informatization promotes improvement of the quality and quantity of life as well as brings about new waves in the entire industry, which can be seen by the widespread use of communication culture such as the Internet, EDI/EC, CALS and Intranet.

Success and prosperity of the individuals and enterprises depend on utilization of information and it becomes an index of competitiveness. But, as the cases of information misuse also increase by taking advantage of this change, the importance of information security draws as much attention.

Most of all, popularization of the Internet enables real time communication beyond the physical special limit but it also entails dysfunction as a return for that. That is, space is being provided where the virus and hacking can prosper.

Last year, we experienced an unprecedented disaster with the CIH virus. At that time, the writer was reminded of collapse of Songsu Bridge. It was caused by insufficient foundation -- placing too much emphasis on moving the project forward, and was inevitable due to insensitivity to security.

Various data prove that Korea is quite vulnerable to hacking also. Worst of all, there was a report that the overseas hackers can tease whatever site they want.

It is a time to take a security cost as the indispensable one. At first thought, efforts and costs required for safety can be taken as unnecessary but, in the long run, it can prevent an accident in advance, which will eventually prevent significant loss with less cost.

Safety costs and efforts are the critical factor in enhancing competitiveness of each company and, if we think further, a country. It has something in common with car insurance subscription.

People used to think that subscription is wasteful when no accident is experienced. They think the accident as a matter of others and they will never come up with it.

However, once it happens, the individual cannot bear the amount of damage or legal responsibility.

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