For Consideration by the Summit

UN Chronicle, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview

For Consideration by the Summit


Specific suggestions put forward by the Secretary-General in his report, detailed in earlier pages of this section, for the Millennium Assembly to consider when it meets in September this year.

By 2015, halve the proportion of the world's people (currently 22%) whose income is less than a dollar a day, and the proportion of people (currently 20%) who are unable to reach, or to afford, safe drinking-water; ensure that all children everywhere will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling, and that girls and boys will have equal access to all levels of education; halt and begin to reverse, the spread of HIV/AIDS.

By 2020, achieve significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers around the world.

Develop strategies that will give young people everywhere the chance of finding decent work.

Ensure that the benefits of new technology, especially information technology, are available to all.

Ask every national government to commit itself to national policies and programmes directed specifically at reducing poverty, to be developed and applied in consultation with civil society.

At the international level, developed countries could:

* grant free access to their markets for goods produced in poor countries--and, as a first step, be prepared, at the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries in March 2001, to adopt a policy of duty-free and quota-free access for essentially all exports from the least developed countries;

* implement without delay the expansion of the debt relief programme for heavily indebted poor countries (HIPO) agreed last year, and be prepared to cancel all official debts of the HIPO, in return for those countries making demonstrable commitments to poverty reduction;

* provide more generous development assistance, particularly to those countries which are genuinely applying their resources to poverty reduction;

* work with the pharmaceutical industry and other partners to develop an effective and affordable vaccine against HIV; and to make HIV-related drugs more widely accessible in developing countries.

At both the national and international levels, resolve to develop strong partnerships with the private sector to combat poverty in all its aspects, and in all our efforts, make special provision for the needs of Africa, and give our full support to Africans in their struggle to overcome the continent's problems.

Spare no effort to free our fellow men and women from the scourge of war, as the Charter requires, resolving:

* to strengthen respect for law, in international as in national affairs, in particular the agreed provisions of treaties on the control of armaments, and international humanitarian and human rights law. …

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