Arts . . .: Keep It in the Family

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), September 5, 2000 | Go to article overview

Arts . . .: Keep It in the Family


Ireland's foremost watercolourist is T P (Terry) Flanagan, his iconic fluid Fermanagh land, reed and dappled waterscapes but a fragment of his complex, distinguished, appealing and technically brilliant oeuvre.

His son Philip (40), born in Belfast but now living in Fermanagh, has carved out a career for himself as a portrait sculptor working mostly in bronze, a man to whom you could say "Bring me the head of . . . Seamus Heaney, Tom Carr, Dr Ian Paisley, John Hume or Charlie Haughey" without a thought of decapitation in your mind.

Daughter Catherine has become, self taught, the third accomplished artist in the family trio, having grown up to think that it was quite natural for every house to have an artist's studio in it, and every father to be a painter. The majority of her works are watercolours, some suffused with the same soft daylight her father catches so well, some entirely of a definite style she has made her own. …

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