A Letter from the Editor

Contemporary Review, July 2000 | Go to article overview

A Letter from the Editor


WE are pleased to announce that starting with this, the 277th volume of Contemporary Review, the size of the journal will grow by eight pages.

The new 64-page journal -- free from the intrusion and influence of advertising -- will allow us to give more space both to articles and to reviews.

The expansion in size, as well as the start of a web site (www.contemporaryreview.co.uk), reflects the fact that the editing, printing, and publishing of Contemporary Review is now done in Oxford. This increase in the size of one of the world's oldest journals is the first for many decades.

We have remained true to the basic idea of our Victorian forerunners. Contemporary Review continues to be a learned and serious but not a specialist journal.

We believe there is a continuing role for a journal that can present intelligent readers with substantial articles about the world we live in today.

Specialist journals with their forests of footnotes and walls of jargon exclude all but a few from understanding their well guarded territory. We hope that our readers can both learn from as well as enjoy our articles.

Our longest serving editor, Dr G. P. Gooch, whose tenure ran for the extraordinary length of almost half a century -- from 1911 to 1960 -- believed that Contemporary Review should concentrate on international and political affairs. As a distinguished historian and man of letters, he wanted these mixed with articles about history, literature and cultural affairs. The present issue shows how we have remained true to that mixture.

The present issue also shows how we draw writers from all over the world. Many have deep personal experiences of different countries and cultures and are therefore well able to address readers of an international journal.

In this issue, for example, we have authors from four continents writing about developments in the six inhabited continents of the world. Two academics in Australia, one from an English and the other from an Islamic background, write in the first case on a recent coup in Ecuador and in the other, about the relations between Australia and Asia. A Brazilian scholar, who divides her time between her native land and England, describes the economic developments in Latin America, while a Hungarian journalist based in Budapest and London discusses the role of waterways in the new Russian economy. …

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