FDIC Offers Creative Alternatives

By Blackwell, Rob | American Banker, September 7, 2000 | Go to article overview

FDIC Offers Creative Alternatives


Blackwell, Rob, American Banker


When Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan says he hates your idea, it is time to come up with a plan B -- or several of them.

That is what the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. quietly has done by tucking inside its reform plan some creative alternatives to doubling coverage to $200,000 per account. These new wrinkles include selling banks additional federal coverage or relying, at least in part, on private insurers.

Industry representatives said that these alternatives, though intriguing, may be too complicated and that they will stick to their original position.

"Clearly, we prefer a straight raise in the coverage limit," said Karen Thomas, director of regulatory affairs for the Independent Community Bankers of America. "We have a lot of questions as to how these other options would work in practice."

The FDIC, however, had to do something after top policymakers responded harshly to initial hints the agency wanted to increase coverage for the first time in two decades.

When Chairman Donna Tanoue broached the idea in March, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Phil Gramm immediately opposed it and said the present coverage is already too high. The idea seemed dead for sure when Mr. Greenspan and Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers opposed an increase at a Senate hearing in July, testifying that it would contradict efforts to encourage market discipline and could invite another debacle like the thrift crisis.

Though reluctant to discuss further details, agency officials included in their 84-page "options paper" issued last month three alternatives that would let some banks offer excess insurance.

Under one alternative, the FDIC would, in essence, sell insurance to banks that wanted it. Financial institutions would pay an extra premium for the added coverage, and possibly pass that cost on to account holders.

What remains to be seen, however, is how the higher premium would be determined, or exactly how much extra coverage could be offered.

Under a second option, the FDIC would provide -- for a fee -- a government guarantee for private excess insurance. Though several companies already offer private insurance, none have the backing of the federal government.

An advantage of that alternative is that it would retain a role for the market in setting premiums. …

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