Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

`Unbiased' China Data Needed, Senator Insists

By Gertz, Bill | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 15, 2000 | Go to article overview

`Unbiased' China Data Needed, Senator Insists


Gertz, Bill, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


U.S. intelligence agencies have a benign view of China and need more "alternative" analysis of the United States' most important future challenge, the chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence said yesterday.

In an interview, Sen. Richard C. Shelby, Alabama Republican, said he is working on legislation that would require more "unbiased" intelligence studies of China.

"What we're interested in is good analysis; the nation depends on it," Mr. Shelby said. "It has to be good, it has to be accurate; it has to be unbiased. Now, having said that, at times it's hard to get it." Mr. Shelby spoke to The Washington Times in his Senate office. He said it is very important to get the analysis on China correct because policy decisions made now will influence whether or not the United States will be prepared to meet the future challenge of China.

"Fifteen years from now I could see a different China than we see today," he said. "I do see a China with possibly a vigorous economy and a modernized arsenal, nuclear and conventional, with more navy."

Legislation to fix analytical problems will be added to the current Senate Intelligence Committee's authorization.

Mr. Shelby said the Senate intelligence oversight panel and its House counterpart "have to rigorously examine any findings regarding China, considering China could be a formidable, heaven forbid, military adversary."

"China is going to be our biggest challenge, militarily and economically, down the road," he said.

China is rapidly modernizing both its industry and military, he said.

"To turn a blind eye to that or to say that it's not going to happen for 40 years or 50 years, I think is being naive," Mr. Shelby said.

A Senate aide said the current cadre of China analysts tend to view China as "a benevolent panda bear" based on past U.S.-Chinese ties. "And a lot of that has seeped into the analytical products," he said.

"It's hard for a lot of people to conceive China as a threat because we've viewed them generally as benign," the aide said. "We're trying to encourage more contrarian and alternative analysis within the intelligence community, in the CIA in particular, on China."

More competitive analysis is needed on security-related issues, such as Chinese military developments.

For example, China is not trying to compete directly with the U.S. military in the same way Moscow did during the Cold War, the aide said.

"You frequently hear people say the Chinese navy . . . couldn't defeat the U.S. Navy in the battle of Midway if it were held today," the aide said. "But that's not what they need to do. What they need to do is create a zone of free action around Taiwan - that's their biggest priority - and if they can make a U.S. president hesitate or be deterred from acting in that area, then they've done what they need to do."

The leading advocate of China's inability to build a modern fighting force is retired Rear Adm.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

`Unbiased' China Data Needed, Senator Insists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.