PART THREE: Photographs by George Alexander Grant of National Monuments and Parks in the American Southwest

Journal of the Southwest, Summer 2000 | Go to article overview

PART THREE: Photographs by George Alexander Grant of National Monuments and Parks in the American Southwest


Figure 14. El Morro National Monument, New Mexico (1906). (Grant negative El Morro 3, taken 29 July 1929.)

Note: Figures 14-38 are arranged in the order of presidential proclamation of monuments under the authority of the Antiquities Act (date of proclamation is in parentheses following the monument name in the caption), except for Mesa Verde National Park established by Congress in 1906. Photos courtesy of the Western Archeological and Conservation Center of the National Park Service in Tucson.

Figure 15. Custodian Evon Zart Vogt and daughter Joan, El Morro National Monument, New Mexico (1906). (Grant negative El Morro 4, taken 29 July 1929.)

Figure 16. Montezuma Castle National Monument, Arizona (1906), showing ladders that allowed tourists to explore the ruins, a practice no longer permitted. (Grant negative Montezuma Castle 1a, taken 30 June 1929.)

Figure 17. Petrified Forest National Monument, Arizona (1906), redesignated Petrified Forest National Park in 1962. (Grant negative Petrified Forest 150, taken 8 October 1934.)

Figure 18. Chetro Ketl Ruin with Pueblo Bonito in the distance, Chaco Canyon National Monument, New Mexico (1907), incorporated in Chaco Culture National Historical Park in 1980. (Grant negative Chaco Canyon 130, taken 14 September 1934.)

Figure 19. Grand Canyon National Monument, Arizona (1908), incorporated in Grand Canyon National Park in 1919. (Grant negative Grand Canyon 411B, taken 6 July 1930.)

Figure 20. Tumacacori National Monument, Arizona (1908), incorporated in Tumacacori National Historical Park in 1990. (Grant negative Tumacacori 1, taken 18 July 1929.)

Figure 21. Keet Seel Ruin, Navajo National Monument, Arizona (1909). (Grant negative Keet Seel 11, taken 17 September 1935.)

Figure 22. Betatakin Ruin, Navajo National Monument, Arizona (1909). (Grant negative Betatakin 10B, taken 16 September 1935.)

Figure 23. Mukuntuweap National Monument, Utah (1909), incorporated in Zion National Park in 1919. (Grant negative Zion 418, taken 12 September 1929.)

Figure 24. Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Utah (1910). (Grant negative Rainbow Bridge 29, taken 23 September 1946.)

Figure 25. Tyuonyi Ruin, Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico (1916). (Grant negative Bandelier 59, taken 30 August 1934.)

Figure 26. Casa Grande National Monument, Arizona (1918), first established as Casa Grande Ruin Reservation in 1892, redesignated Casa Grande Ruins National Monument for its centennial in 1992. (Grant negative Casa Grande 58, taken 20 August 1934.)

Figure 27. Bryce Canyon National Monument, Utah (1923), incorporated in Bryce Canyon National Park in 1928. (Grant negative Bryce Canyon 336, taken 16July 1935.)

Figure 28. Carlsbad Cave National Monument, New Mexico (1923), redesignated Carlsbad Caverns National Park in 1930. (Grant negative Carlsbad Caverns 123, taken 26 October 1934.)

Figure 29. Chiricahua National Monument, Arizona (1924). (Grant negative Chiricahua 8, taken 7 October 1935.)

Figure 30. Wupatki National Monument, Arizona (1924). (Grant negative Wupatki 10, taken 21 September 1935.)

Figure 31. Arches National Monument, Utah (1929), redesignated Arches National Park in 1971. (Grant negative Arches 104, taken 13 August 1939.)

Figure 32. Sunset Crater National Monument, Arizona (1930), redesignated Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument in 1990. (Grant negative Sunset 1, taken 23 September 1935.)

Figure 33. White House Ruin, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona (1931). (Grant negative Canyon de Chelly 2, taken 19 October 1932.)

Figure 34. Saguaro National Monument, Arizona (1933), incorporated in Saguaro National Park in 1998. (Grant negative Saguaro 19, taken 4 October 1935.)

Figure 35. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona (1937). (Grant negative Organ Pipe 2, taken 19 June 1935. …

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PART THREE: Photographs by George Alexander Grant of National Monuments and Parks in the American Southwest
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