Editorial Comment Spring 1998

By Hodgetts, Richard M. | Journal of Leadership Studies, Spring 1998 | Go to article overview

Editorial Comment Spring 1998


Hodgetts, Richard M., Journal of Leadership Studies


In the previous issue I shared with you some of the changes that we are now implementing in the Journal. One was the addition of a number of new editorial review board members. Another was the creation of an Interview Editor. A third was the appointment of a new Book Review Editor. A fourth was the decision to give two annual awards for outstanding articles. One will be given to the doctoral student(s) whose paper is judged to be the best. The other will be for the best submission by a nondoctoral student.

In following up on these developments and instituting a few others that are designed to strengthen the Journal even further and extend its scope and breadth, I am happy to tell you that I have put together a group of five members of the Editorial Review Board to serve as the Awards Committee. These awards will be determined in the first quarter of next year and this year's winners will be announced in the Winter 1999 issue.

Another change that I have made is the addition of a Leadership Case editor. In each issue I am going to try and publish a current case dealing with leadership issues and challenges and offering leadership lessons. I have asked Donald Kuratko, one of the newest members of our editorial board, to head this effort. The first of these cases, written by Don and his colleagues, is being published in this issue.

A third new edition is the inclusion of leadership excerpts drawn from books about famous leaders. Starting with this issue, we will begin a series of historical sketches of business leaders of the past. The first selection is that of Richard Sears, founder of Sears Roebuck. In future issues I hope to include such notables as Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Cyrus McCormick, and Andrew Carnegie.

Also, in keeping with the theme I established in the previous issue, I would like to tell you a little about some of the new editorial board members.

Ray Aldag is a Professor of Management at the University of Wisconsin. Ray is a past president of the Academy of Management and has authored one of the leading introduction to management books in the field. He is also a well-established and respected researcher and writer in the field.

Arthur Bedeian is a Professor of Management at the University of Louisiana in Baton Rouge and an internationally-known management historian and researcher. Art has been published in all of the leading management journals and his Management Laureates is recognized as one of the most insightful series of biographies of current contributors to the management field.

Donald Kuratko is one of the nation's leading entrepreneurship experts. In addition being the Stoops Distinguished Professor in Business and the Director of the Entrepreneurship Program at Ball State University, Don has been the recipient of a host of entrepreneurship awards including the Leavey Foundation Award for Excellent in Private Enterprise. He is also, as I noted earlier, the Journal's Leadership Case editor.

Fred Luthans is the George Holmes Distinguished Professor of Management at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a leading scholar in the area of behavior and leadership. Fred's Organizational Behavior text is now in its 8th edition and continues to be a leading seller, and his recent research in the area of leadership in the international arena has been published in a variety of leading journals including the Journal of International Business. …

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Editorial Comment Spring 1998
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