New Tools at Avebury

By Burton, Nick | Antiquity, June 2000 | Go to article overview

New Tools at Avebury


Burton, Nick, Antiquity


Although significant to societies at a local, regional and national level for up to 6000 years, the prehistoric landscape of Avebury, Wiltshire, was formally attributed the accolade of being `globally important' in November 1986. At this time the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) inscribed Avebury onto the growing list of World Heritage Sites (http://www.unesco.org/ whc), and along with England's most notorious prehistoric monument, `Stonehenge, Avebury, and associated sites' (C373) was created.

The joint nomination of both Avebury and Stonehenge by the UK government was rational. At a time when no UK sites were on the list, seven UK applications were being presented to UNESCO and it was considered that there would be a better chance of both landscapes being accepted if they were considered as one site. Indeed, in comparison with the variety of cultural and temporal variation in nominations, Stonehenge and Avebury are similar. It is true that upon closer inspection there are both comparable and contrasting patterns of monument type, construction, use and disuse, but when comparing these differences to those between here and Durham Castle or Ironbridge Gorge, for example, Stonehenge and Avebury certainly have an affinity.

However, the two landscapes are over 20 km apart, which presents problems when approaching the management and study of the cultural environment. Between the two areas lies the broad Vale of Pewsey and the upland of Salisbury Plain which has meant that, to consider the World Heritage Site effectively, two boundaries have been delineated, one for each landscape. This has some advantages. Further to their geographical separation, very different situations have arisen at both sites. For example, Avebury has a village community at the heart of the landscape whereas Stonehenge is more isolated from settlements. However, Stonehenge is troubled by busy roads and the impact of a concentration of visitors on one very small patch of ground. The creation of two boundaries has meant that it is possible, when necessary, to consider them separately.

The production of Management Plans has been one such occasion and Avebury has been the first of the two to pass through this process (Pomeroy 1998). This is not unique to UK sites and follows previous plans for Hadrian's Wall (1996) and Greenwich (1997). What has been unique at Avebury, however, is the construction of a spatial database alongside, and as part of, the formulation of the Management Plan. The construction of the Avebury WHS Geographical Information System (GIS) has been established with the aim of integrating data already held by various bodies, recording information resulting from the production of the plan, helping to formulate decisions and, most importantly, becoming a fundamental tool in aiding the implementation of any recommendations.

The database has been developed in consultation with the Avebury WHS Steering Committee and Avebury Archaeological and Historical Research Group, by English Heritage at its Centre for Archaeology. A GIS study area of 13x12 km has been chosen -- an area much larger than the limits of the WHS boundary at Avebury. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Tools at Avebury
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.