Republic of China: New Model for Human Rights, Democracy in 21st Century

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), October 10, 2000 | Go to article overview

Republic of China: New Model for Human Rights, Democracy in 21st Century


The Republic of China has been a sovereign state since it was established in 1912. Its history of democratic development reached a pinnacle in 1996, with the holding of the nation's first direct election of the president. In March 2000, the Democratic Progressive Party candidates, Chen Shui-bian and Hsiu-Lien Annettee Lu, were elected the 10th-term president and vice president of the ROC. Taiwan experienced its first peaceful transfer of power in a half century and the peaceful transition of power proved that democracy in Taiwan had reached a new level of maturity.

Since assuming office, President Chen Shui-bian has emphasized strengthening democracy and the protection of human rights. He has declared that the ROC, although not a member of the United Nations, would abide by the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and various other international human rights agreements. He has also proposed a national human rights committee to safeguard the universal values of human rights. The president has expressed his hope that the ROC would become a full participant in the international human rights system, making Taiwan a new model for human rights in the 21st century.

The ROC is known throughout the world for its extraordinary economic achievements and has been recognized in recent years for its vibrant democracy and respect for human rights. The ROC is willing to share its valuable experiences in democratic and economic development. Unfortunately, the authorities in Beijing have repeatedly interfered in the ROC's foreign relations to the detriment of the international community.

As a democratic nation and member of the global community, the ROC upholds international human rights standards and democracy. It responsibly assists developing nations with generous economic and humanitarian aid programs. Thus, it is clearly unfair to deny membership in the United Nations to the 23 million people of Taiwan, who cherish peace, democracy, and freedom. ROC participation in the U. …

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Republic of China: New Model for Human Rights, Democracy in 21st Century
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