Rumors Fly about Saddam Hussein's Health

By Dettmer, Jamie | Insight on the News, October 2, 2000 | Go to article overview

Rumors Fly about Saddam Hussein's Health


Dettmer, Jamie, Insight on the News


The diplomatic grapevine in the Middle East is abuzz with rumors that Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein's days may be numbered -- and not as a result of any covert action launched by the CIA or Persian Gulf neighbors Iran and Saudi Arabia. The Butcher of Baghdad is said to be suffering from lymphatic cancer and undergoing treatment in a villa on the outskirts of the Iraqi capital.

Rumors about Saddam's ill health first began to circulate in July when Iraqi opposition figures suggested he was suffering from cancer. A few weeks later a London-based Arab newspaper also reported that Swiss doctors were treating the Iraqi leader.

While it is impossible to confirm that Saddam is ill, there are signs of unusual activity in Baghdad. Saddam has told his family circle that his youngest son, Quasi Hussein, should be considered his successor, according to Arab sources in the Iraqi capital. Those sources say also that the 34-year-old Quasi appears to be heading a family committee that is involved in much of the day-to-day running of the country.

This isn't the first time rumors have linked Saddam with cancer. In 1996 there were claims he was suffering from the illness. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rumors Fly about Saddam Hussein's Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.