`The Chief' Lives on at Hearst Castle

By Fields, Suzanne | Insight on the News, October 2, 2000 | Go to article overview

`The Chief' Lives on at Hearst Castle


Fields, Suzanne, Insight on the News


At this summer's political conventions, the reporters and commentators for newspapers, TV networks and dot-com sites chafed over the dearth of sensational news.

One day the protesters chased several of us past the grand old Los Angeles Herald Examiner building in downtown L.A., which stands boldly astride a street now grown tatty and forlorn. With its Moorish detail and majestic cupola -- in which William Randolph Hearst often slept -- the building bears silent testimony to another time and, indeed, another place.

No more sensational headlines or front-page editorials written by Hearst thunder from the printing presses. No lights burn through the night above men in green eyeshades, reading dispatches from correspondents flung across the globe. The building serves mainly now as a backdrop for movie and TV commercials, a mocking reflection of its former self.

Hearst, known in his day as "The Chief" wouldn't believe the changes that have taken place in the newspaper business. In the Los Angeles of the 1920s he owned both the Examiner in the morning and the Herald in the afternoon. He had proved his mettle years earlier when he took over the San Francisco Examiner and doubled its readership -- and then doubled it again.

"A hundred years ago, before anyone used the word `synergy' Hearst put the concept into practice," writes David Nasaw in a new biography, The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst.

Hearst not only ran 28 newspapers and frequently dictated editorials to all of them, but created a magazine empire -- Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping and Harper's Bazaar. He produced newsreels, bought radio stations, ran a successful movie studio and introduced the first moving-picture serials, including the classic Perils of Pauline. His newspapers practically invented Billy Graham.

Hearst believed that to make a good newspaper you had to spend money -- lots of it -- to advertise and to buy the best talent. When he bought the New York Journal in 1895 he ran it like an impresario of news and entertainment. Bands marched through streets announcing the new paper. Posters were everywhere teasing its stories -- on billboards, wagons, streetcars and elevated trains. He stole top writers, editors, cartoonists and graphic artists from competing papers, raising their salaries until the competition fell away.

So where better to go, after the dearth of sensational news in Los Angeles, than to Hearst Castle, 180 miles north on the California coastline at San Simeon, to soak up a little of the man, the myth and even a little of the reality of better times than these, at least for newspapers.

Some of us grew up on Citizen Kane, the magnificent movie made by Orson Welles in 1941, and we'll always imagine Charles Foster Kane as the real William Randolph Hearst. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

`The Chief' Lives on at Hearst Castle
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.