Lauren Booth

By Booth, Lauren | New Statesman (1996), October 9, 2000 | Go to article overview

Lauren Booth


Booth, Lauren, New Statesman (1996)


Tony's clones were discussing Prezza's mental health and Mo's farting

Last Saturday night, I'd been invited by the incredibly trendy Charlotte Raven to her relaxed cocktail-cum-birthday party. It was at her home in NW3--and I was the only one wearing a cocktail dress. Everyone else was in fabulously cut jeans and easy-to-iron shirts.

I didn't want to think about politics. I'd been up since 4am for my radio show, had reviewed the papers and heard 18 different views on what impact the latest poll results would have on Downing Street. I simply wanted to meet a roomful of drunken adults all pretending to be drunken teenagers. Things started well enough at the party, with Caspar, the ex-singer with "a really crappy band", chaffing to Damian, an ad man, about indie music over the potted palm. Beautiful and quirky women gossiped about dating, New York style, and two men were daring each other to do a complete striptease on the sofa. Perfect.

Then, the six words I hate most came drifting in from the kitchen. "The thing about William Hague is..."

The source's name was Ed or Matt or Jonathan, and he was introduced as someone who "knows Gordon". The moment he spotted me, he approached, a fanatical gleam in his eyes. My heart sank: when you're distantly related to Tony Blair by marriage and mis-marriage, there's never a night off. The Blair clones just have to have a go.

Groping miserably for a handful of crisps to sustain me, I felt like a naughty schoolgirl as he began bombarding me with Millbank-style questions. "First of all, what's wrong with NHS Direct, Lauren? Hmm? What's your problem?" This charming banter was followed by: "Why can't your sort just appreciate what we're doing for this country?" Feet away, ex-supporters of Militant were gleefully pogoing to Fat Boy Slim while I was trapped, struggling to outline reasons why "direct action should still exist in a 21st-century, middle-of-the-road democracy". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lauren Booth
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.