Billy Elliot

By Stuart, Jan | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), October 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Billy Elliot


Stuart, Jan, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


Billy Elliot * Written by Lee Hall * Directed by Stephen Daldry * Starring Julie Walters, Gary Lewis, Jamie Bell, Jamie Draven * Universal Focus

With a maximum of heart and a minimum of schmaltz, British import Billy Elliot tells how one boy finds himself through ballet

There is a quiet little girl in blue who idles on the lane next door to Billy Elliot, hugging tight to a brick wall as she watches her northeast England community pass by. Billy barely notices her. But you sense that she knows everything about this 11-year-old boy and that someday when he is big and famous, she will overcome her bashfulness and share lots of stories with a reporter from the Daily Mail.

The hardscrabble town of Durham, where Billy (Jamie Bell) lives with his recently widowed dad (Gary Lewis), his older brother, Tony (Jamie Draven), and his out-of-it grandmother (Jean Heywood), is a place to escape from, a sooty, tree-hostile universe of bad wallpaper, mobile libraries, and shuttered cinemas. His coal miner dad has never even seen the outskirts of Durham, which is especially depressing if your day is circumscribed by the grim routine of a miners' strike and your wife's gravestone.

Into the postcard-perfect purgatory of Billy Elliot drops Mrs. Wilkinson, a ravaged ballet teacher. As played with flinty ennui by Julie Walters, she's Glinda the Good Witch by way of Miss Hannigan. Lording over her petite charges with one arm akimbo and the other holding a cigarette aloft, looking like a very pissed-off teakettle, she barks instructions with a mechanical weariness that all but says, What's the point?

Billy is her answer, and she is his. When Billy stumbles out of boxing class and into her ballet class, Mrs. Wilkinson smells a budding protege. Billy drops the needle on T. Rex's "I Love to Boogie," and Mrs. Wilkinson launches him on a clandestine tutorial to prepare him to audition for the Royal Ballet School. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Billy Elliot
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.