College Teachers Go Back to Class Effective Teaching Becomes Top Priority

By Womble, Shannon | The Florida Times Union, October 28, 2000 | Go to article overview

College Teachers Go Back to Class Effective Teaching Becomes Top Priority


Womble, Shannon, The Florida Times Union


ATLANTA -- Chosen University System of Georgia faculty are learning how to become more effective teachers, something often overlooked, according to teachers and officials.

The system-sponsored conference held Thursday included workshops and lectures designed to send faculty back to class with new techniques.

"I know lots of people who give beautiful, seamless lectures that go right over the heads of even their best students," said Thomas Angelo, associate professor and director of the Assessment Center at DePaul University's School for New Learning. "While students know that person is smart, they aren't learning a whole lot."

Improving teaching to increase learning is a priority of policy makers in Georgia because they see evidence of the need.

For example, a report issued yesterday by Rep. Charlie Smith Jr., D-St. Marys, shows half the graduates of Georgia high schools enrolled in the state's technical schools this year take remedial courses. His report is just one of many indicators showing the state's high school graduates aren't fully prepared for higher learning.

Gov. Roy Barnes will likely push for accountability measures for the system's 34 colleges and universities during the next General Assembly, similar to the reform legislation reshaping the state's public schools.

With education receiving such attention, education officials are rushing to provide teachers at all levels with new techniques to improve classroom learning. …

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