The Nike Chain-Saw Massacre

By Vilanch, Bruce | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), November 7, 2000 | Go to article overview

The Nike Chain-Saw Massacre


Vilanch, Bruce, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


It was with great regret that I noted the death of the phrase "reality check" some weeks ago. It happened when I used it and everyone at the table stared at me and someone finally piped up with "God, I haven't heard that since the '80s." The shame. The recrimination. I'd been dealing with reality checks for an entire spare decade and nobody had set me straight. On the other hand, when I asked what the phrase had been replaced with, nobody could tell me, which is a sure sign that reality still needs checking and plenty of it.

Later that evening I was looking at coverage of the Sydney Olympics, which was delayed by so many hours that it might have been from the next Olympics. Lacking any sense of suspense, the show was dominated by its commercials, which were full of surprises. First there was what looked like a full-bore slasher movie--and this just days before Congress was to begin its finger-wagging over how movies are marketed to teenagers. A gorgeous teenage girl (actually runner Suzy Hamilton) is running from a madman in a hockey mask wielding a chain saw. Over the river and through the woods to grandmother's house they go, eventually stopping only when the psycho runs out of breath and has to sit down. The girl keeps going, and that's when we discover that what saved her life is that she's dressed in Nike.

Pretty good. A couple of desultory high jumps later, that John Hancock insurance commercial popped on--the one featuring a couple of women waiting anxiously at an airport gate for what turns out to be an Asian baby who's delivered into their loving arms. I suppose they could be a pair of Caucasian aunts, but my guess is, even your Caucasian aunt would figure that they are lesbians and their family is extending right before our eyes. Bravo, John Hancock! And so to bed.

The next morning the paper was full of ... those commercials. Go know. First of all, everybody was up in arms about Nike Girl and her narrow escape from the Colombian necklace. The imagery of the mad slasher sullying the Olympics! How could something so perverse be allowed to sell sneakers? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Nike Chain-Saw Massacre
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.