Somehow It's All Architecture and Design

Sunset, June 1988 | Go to article overview

Somehow It's All Architecture and Design


Somehow it's all architecture and design

Going on this month in San Francisco There are many ways to shape a space; events this month and next show that it can be done with sand, paint, furniture, a glass facade. It's all architecture and design, and it's all on view in San Francisco--at two exhibitions, a sandcastle competition, and an auction. Through June: New headquarters of the San Francisco chapter of the American Institute of Architects, on the sixth floor of the Hallidie Building (130 Sutter Street, across from the Crocker Galleria), presents drawings by the building's architect, Willis Polk, famous for designs throughout the city. Hours are 9 to 5 weekdays. Through July 5: Limn Gallery (457 Pacific Avenue) and Limn Annex (821 Sansome Street) present "Nouveau Style Francais," an exhibition of almost 200 pieces of French furniture dating from the 1920s to the present. Hours are 9:30 to 5:30 weekdays, 11 to 5:30 Saturdays. Sunday, June 12: The beach at Aquatic Park is the site of the fifth annual LEAP Architects' Sandcastle Competition, sponsored by Learning through Education in the Arts Project. From low tide (around 10 A.M.), more than 20 architectural firms compete in such highfalutin' categories as Best Recognizable Monument and Best Urban Design. Judging begins around 1. Friday, June 17: Rincon Center (Mission and Second streets) hosts an auction and sale of architectural artifacts to benefit the Foundation for San Francisco's Architectural Heritage. …

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