They Throw Stones and Call Us Names ...but Westilllove Scotland; Forced to Flee War, the Refugees Thought Their Suffering Was Over

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), November 20, 2000 | Go to article overview

They Throw Stones and Call Us Names ...but Westilllove Scotland; Forced to Flee War, the Refugees Thought Their Suffering Was Over


Byline: SHARON WARD

CHILD refugees and asylum seekers in Scotland's cities are living as prisoners in their own homes, suffering racist taunts and stone attacks every time they venture outside.

Traumatised by the atrocities they witnessed in their home countries, the youngsters fled to Scotland in the hope of starting a new life in freedom and peace.

But for many, life has been made unbearable because of the bullying and violence they face.

The abuse includes stones being thrown at them in the street, even at one refugee baby.

Air rifles have been fired and windows broken as the kids are subjected to shouting, swearing, being chased home and beatings.

Despite this, the youngsters still say they love Scotland and are very glad to be living here.

Their suffering is revealed in a damning report by Save The Children Scotland and the Scottish Refugee Council, which claims almost every child has faced hostility and racist abuse since arriving in Scotland.

Both charities are calling on the Scottish Executive to establish a cross-departmental working group on refugee and asylum issues.

Among those who have sought refuge in Scotland are children from Kosovo, Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Russia, Georgia, Estonia and Chile.

Sue Fisher, Assistant Director at Save the Children Scotland, said: "These children are children first and refugees and asylum seekers second.

"They are children who have already been through far too much by way of war, displacement, suffering and trauma and they deserve our welcome and our support, yet many continue to suffer in other ways even when they reach the seemingly safe haven of our country.

"We believe they should have the same rights as other children and, in a country famed for its hospitality, a chance for a happy and safe childhood in Scotland."

Sadly, too often that is not the case.

One refugee, Mary, 12, from Sudan, said: "A few days ago, my brothers went for a walk and were beaten up. Now we are scared to leave the house."

Jane, 13, from Kosovo, said: "Scotland is nice, but when I feel like going out to play or for a walk, I can't go, since people throw stones at us, swear at us and harass us.

"We used to live with dignity in our country, but circumstances forced us to come here."

The heart-breaking testimony of these children dispels the myth that the majority of refugees and asylum seekers are bogus, coming here because, in William Hague's words, they see Britain as a soft touch.

Many of the refugees are living in extreme poverty, with families allowed just 70 per cent of basic income support.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

They Throw Stones and Call Us Names ...but Westilllove Scotland; Forced to Flee War, the Refugees Thought Their Suffering Was Over
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.