Net News

By Felix, Kathie | Multimedia Schools, October 2000 | Go to article overview

Net News


Felix, Kathie, Multimedia Schools


Great American Smokeout Online

November 16 has been designated as the date for the 24th Annual Great American Smokeout, the American Cancer Society's nationally recognized day when smokers are urged to prove to themselves that they can be smoke-free for life if they can quit tobacco for a day. A series of online activities in support of the day have been developed to encourage kids to take control of tobacco's effect on their lives. The tools for youngsters at the Y2Kidz.org Web site include information that deflates popular tobacco advertising myths and provides the facts on the contents of cigarette smoke--arsenic, ammonia, carbon monoxide, tar, and nicotine. A Stuff the Puff Bulletin Board allows youngsters to sound off about ad myths, peer pressure, and smoking's social consequences. The Great American Smokeout Pledge is available online for students to sign and distribute, promising to lead a smoke-free life. Virtual postcards are also available to send to legislators to encourage increased education about the dangers of tobacco--and to send to loved ones who smoke to encourage them to kick the habit. Studies show that more than 80 percent of the 47 million adult Americans who smoke started lighting up before age 18. Seven out of 10 high school students have tried cigarettes, and more than one-third are regular smokers. According to the American Cancer Society, there are 3,000 new adolescent smokers every day. American Cancer Society, 404/320-3333 or http://www.Y2Kidz.org/.

Social Factors and Scholastic Performance

"Student Assessment and Student Achievement in the California Public School System," a new study from the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST), points to a direct relationship between social factors of race, poverty, and English-speaking ability and the scholastic performance of California students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Net News
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.