Celebrating Modern Art

USA TODAY, November 2000 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Celebrating Modern Art


Knowledgeable and passionate about contemporary and modern art, Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson have assembled one of the world's greatest private collections.

HARRY W. ANDERSON and Mary Margaret Ransford met at Hobart College, Geneva, N.Y., in the late 1940s and were married in 1950. While still a senior at the school, he founded the Saga Corporation along with two of his classmates. The company began as a food service provider to colleges and universities (with Hobart as its first client) and later expanded into such markets as health care and business.

In the early 1960s, the Andersons relocated to the San Francisco Bay Area and established a headquarters operation for Saga in Menlo Park. In 1978, after serving as co-CEO for 30 years, he retired from active management of the company, which was subsequently purchased by the Marriott Corporation.

During 1964, a visit to Europe transformed the couple's budding interest in art collecting into a lifelong passion. By 1969, after brief periods of acquiring Impressionist, European Modernist, German Expressionist, and early American Modernist works, the Andersons decided to concentrate on postwar American art, although they retained sculpture and works on paper from the early periods. Today, their main collecting interest lies in the areas of Abstract Expressionism, California art, and contemporary art.

Over the years, items from the Anderson Collection were installed throughout Saga's Menlo Park headquarters, where it remains on view through a special arrangement with the current owners.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Celebrating Modern Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?