Counterfeiting Couple Pays High Price for Baby Formula Fraud

By Nordenberg, Tamar | FDA Consumer, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Counterfeiting Couple Pays High Price for Baby Formula Fraud


Nordenberg, Tamar, FDA Consumer


Some parents who paid extra money to feed their dairy-sensitive babies a special infant formula instead unwittingly fed them a potentially dangerous milk-based formula. Two southern Californians recently pleaded guilty to the crime of trafficking counterfeit goods and are paying back an infant formula manufacturer more than $200,000 for a scheme that landed mislabeled baby food in grocery stores in their state.

Shane Thompson, who also went by the last name Devisser, and Margaret M. Thompson, who sometimes used the last names Devisser and Bell, bought regular infant formula called "Next Step," which cost $7 to $9 per can, and replaced the cans' labels with glued-on photocopies of labels from the hypoallergenic "Enfamil Nutramigen" that cost three times as much. The husband-and-wife team milked their profits by returning the disguised cheaper baby food for the highend refund.

"Here were two individuals presumably out to make a quick buck," says Jud Bohrer, a special agent in charge with the Food and Drug Administration's Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI). "And the victims were the most vulnerable population, babies who had no choice in the matter."

Feeding a milk-based formula to infants who are sensitive to cow proteins can cause fever, vomiting, skin rash, and diarrhea. Says Bohrer, "Several mothers who unknowingly fed their infants the wrong formula had to rush their babies to the emergency room."

OCI special agents began investigating the sale of counterfeit Nutramigen infant formula in October of last year after getting complaints from Mead Johnson Nutritionals, Evansville, Ind., which makes both Nutramigen and Next Step. Consumers had reported to the company that the so-called Nutramigen looked different than in the past and appeared to be making their babies vomit or refuse to eat.

That October, OCI agents interviewed more than 100 duped consumers and store employees who had encountered the mislabeled product. The agents collected the counterfeit cans, which could be identified because they lacked the marking "NUTRAM" that was embossed on the bottom of the genuine cans.

Meanwhile, Mead Johnson notified major grocery store chains in southern California and area consumers to look out for the counterfeit cans, and FDA asked stores to check the driver's license or other photo identification of anyone who requested a refund for Nutramigen formula. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Counterfeiting Couple Pays High Price for Baby Formula Fraud
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.