Fugitive Former Mexico City Mayor Surfaces in Nicaragua

SourceMex Economic News & Analysis on Mexico, December 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Fugitive Former Mexico City Mayor Surfaces in Nicaragua


The Mexican government has requested the extradition of former Mexico City mayor Oscar Espinosa Villarreal, who is charged with corruption.

Espinosa went into hiding in August rather than face charges that he embezzled and mismanaged 428 million pesos (US$45.5 million) in city funds during his tenure as Mexico City mayor in 1994-1997 (see SourceMex, 2000-08-16).

The former mayor's whereabouts remained unknown for months until he surfaced in Managua in late November. Espinosa turned himself in to authorities and immediately requested political asylum.

Espinosa, a member of the long-governing Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI), contends that he has been unfairly targeted by the center-left Partido de la Revolucion Democratica (PRD), which has held the Mexico City mayoral post since 1997.

"I have not committed any crime," Espinosa told reporters. "I am the victim of political persecution by the PRD."

But Espinosa is not likely to succeed in his asylum request. The motion has been opposed both by the administration of Nicaraguan President Arnoldo Aleman and by members of the opposition Frente Sandinista de Liberacion Nacional (FSLN).

"He is being accused of common crime, and it would a legal distortion to declare him a political refugee," said Jaime Morales Carazo, an aide to Aleman.

FSLN leader Daniel Ortega echoed Morales' statements. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fugitive Former Mexico City Mayor Surfaces in Nicaragua
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.