Exaggerated Sculptures Bring a Touch of Humour; ART and Exhibitions

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), December 15, 2000 | Go to article overview

Exaggerated Sculptures Bring a Touch of Humour; ART and Exhibitions


Byline: Lucy Bell

STRANGELY Familiar is an exhibition of life-size sculptures by Philip Cox at the Herbert Art Gallery, Coventry on until December 30.

You'll enjoy these humorous and sharply observed tributes to some of the world's most famous artists.

Philip Cox creates his sculptures using artists and art works that have interested him since childhood.

The sculptures are not especially accurate - but they are witty, poignant and exaggerated.

Here you can see Pablo Picasso astride a chair, gazing at a picture of Le Repas Frugal, Matisse as an old man, cutting paper to make a collage, melting watches with Salvador Dali, Vincent van Gogh with his famous chair and Stanley Spencer at Swan Upping.

The sculptures are made out of corrugated cardboard and you have to admire the textures and effects Philip Cox creates.

"One of the most enjoyable things is the challenge of turning a sheet of cardboard into something three-dimensional," says Philip.

He became a sculptor by chance - after helping children with school projects. He works instinctively and creates a character by first making the head and face and then the whole body.

NEW SHOWS

BLUE TIT and Hatch by Maurice Hatfield is one of the paintings on show in the 88th annual exhibition by the Coventry and Warwickshire Society of Artists.

Included in the show at at Nuneaton art gallery and museum are ceramics by Pat Freeman. On until January 7.

AN exhibition of watercolours by Michael Riman at Jane Powell art studio, December 8-22.

Michael Riman considers watercolour the most difficult of mediums. His painting is free in the use of translucent washes to create atmosphere and grandeur where close attention to detail is suggested rather than obviously stated.

WILDLIFE artist Sarais Crawshaw holds an exhibition this weekend at Appletrees, Main Street, Willey, just off the A5, near Rugby. Open 10am-4pm Saturday and Sunday. Details 01455 553270.

PAINTINGS for Christmas, an exhibition at the Jane Powell art studio 2, including work by Penny Barford, Andrew Sutton, Rupert Cordeux, Kevin Parrish, Mary Edginton, Valerie Webb, Chris Saunderson and Jo Chaffey. On until December 22 (closed Sunday and Monday).

AT Rugby art gallery, a jewellery box and container design workshop takes place tomorrow from 1.30-3.30pm. For eight to 12-year-olds. pounds 4.

EXHIBITIONS

COVENTRY

The Herbert Art Gallery: Strangely Familiar, life-size sculptures by Philip Cox, until December 30. The Bold and The Beautiful, costumes by some of Coventry's local communities for city festivals, until January 14. …

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