Diversionary Tactics Could Cost You Millions

The Birmingham Post (England), December 19, 2000 | Go to article overview

Diversionary Tactics Could Cost You Millions


Online retailers in Europe and the UK could lose up to half a billion pounds due to potential business being diverted away from their e-commerce sites.

The warning comes from e-business intelligence company Cyveillance International.

Web traffic diversion occurs when web sites leverage the name and brands of leading companies to drive traffic away from key e-tailing sites to other destinations to buy.

'When unsuspecting web surfers are diverted to a site selling the same, alternative or lower-cost products, companies lose revenue that they can't even see - and it's costing them millions during a time when online spending is expected to fall below prior projections,' says Andrew Muir, managing director of Cyveillance International.

To combat costly web diversion, Cyveillance International offers five tips to help e-tailers maximise their sales this holiday season and all year round:

If it ain't linked, fix it. It is critical for e-tailers to identify and fix any broken links on the sites of their partners, affiliates and others that should be driving traffic to their site, but instead are directing shoppers down the road to nowhere. …

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Diversionary Tactics Could Cost You Millions
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