Self-Evaluation Program Helps Teachers Hone Skills Certification Process Improves Performance

By Diamond, Laura | The Florida Times Union, December 20, 2000 | Go to article overview

Self-Evaluation Program Helps Teachers Hone Skills Certification Process Improves Performance


Diamond, Laura, The Florida Times Union


As a teacher for more than 20 years, Rosetta Hamm knew she was good at her job. She wanted to get better.

Now when she works with her first-graders at Mamie Agnes Jones Elementary in Baldwin, Hamm is more open. She gets down on the ground and plays with her students to teach them science. She sometimes draws pictures to teach math.

Hamm learned these skills not from the Duval County School Board or the Florida Department of Education.

Instead, she and thousands of other teachers gained insight into their abilities by seeking National Board Certification -- an exhaustive five-month self-evaluation process in which teachers dissect their methods through testing, videotaping and completing hundreds of hours of paperwork.

The certification, provided by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, is considered one of the highest honors bestowed on teachers. Teachers contact the board to apply for the program and work on it independently.

"It made me look at my faults and improve," said Hamm, who spent every weeknight, weekend and school break last year working toward certification.

"It was the most intense thing I have done, but it helped me be more comfortable to venture out and be creative with my students."

Less than half of all teachers who apply for the certification receive the honor.

Hamm is one of 13 Duval County teachers certified this year.

Elsewhere in Northeast Florida, five St. Johns County teachers, 21 Clay County teachers and 12 Nassau County teachers were certified.

In Florida, those who successfully complete the program are eligible for a $3,500 bonus from the state. Hamm and others said money and recognition were not the inspiration.

For them, the impetus came from a belief that better-trained teachers improve student achievement.

Through the videotaping process, Kevin Sacerdote, a social studies teacher at Paxon School for Advanced Studies, learned he was spending too much time in front of the classroom lecturing.

"I thought I had stopped that, but the videotapes show the truth," said Sacerdote, who has been a teacher for 14 years. "I have learned there are better ways to teach, I have an entire tool belt at my disposal. It has forced me to stretch my mind and be more creative.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Self-Evaluation Program Helps Teachers Hone Skills Certification Process Improves Performance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.