Business Networks Going Strong; National Advertisers Beginning to Nibble at Controlled Titles

By Frenette, Liza | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, December 1988 | Go to article overview

Business Networks Going Strong; National Advertisers Beginning to Nibble at Controlled Titles


Frenette, Liza, Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


Businesses networks going strong

New York City--Although many specialized business magazines are still facing the "who?" hurdle when pitching to national advertisers, some have found that networking is enticing major accounts.

Cahners Magazine Network, Penton Executive Network, Springhouse, Chilton Company and others have found that their high circulation figures, together with their quality readership demographics, have made some noise in the advertising industry. Clients who have listened include Oldsmobile, Apple, IBM, Harris 3/M, TWA, Avis, Hanes, Metropolitan Life and Century 21.

"The people reading these publications are very fine prospects," says Allen Kurzman, vice president of marketing service for Avis. "For us, these are supplemental business publications." Avis, he says, runs the same ads in the Penton, McGraw-Hill and Cahners networks that it does in Forbes, Fortune, Time and Newsweek.

The high-income, professional audience offered by the specialized business magazines, he says, together with the appealing cost per thousand (CPM), persuaded Avis to place advertising in the business networks. "They're ideally suited," says Kurzman. "I am optimistic my kind of message will ring true."

"The management networks enable us to use a broad range of industries very specifically, at a very efficient rate," says Andew Scantland, account supevisor for Harris 3/M at Ogilvy and Mather, Atlanta, Georgia.

$1 million in advertising

Cahners, which spent less than $0.5 million putting together its network--including a Simmons Market Research Bureau Study, a Business Publications Audit, promotion material and advertising--has brought in about $1 million in national advertising since the 36-title network was created a year and a half ago, according to vice president/publisher Peter Boniface.

"I'm really pleased so far," he says. "There is much business on the horizon."

Cahners has picked up Avis, Apple, IBM and Harris 3/M Copiers with publications such as Design News, Professional Builder, Publishers Weekly and the Physician's Travel and Meeting Guide.

The strong selling point, Boniface notes, is the network's male readership age, 25-55, earning $50,000 plus, in professional or managerial positions.

"The publisher has hand-picked subscribers," says Boniface. "They have to be highly qualified. They are people of authority."

Springhouse, the most recent publisher to put networking to use, is also the smallest, with only two publications: Learning '88 and Nursing '88. …

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