Security Management Online

By Gips, Michael A. | Security Management, December 2000 | Go to article overview

Security Management Online


Gips, Michael A., Security Management


http://www.securitymanagement.com

Security Management Online has amassed a trove of documents covering all facts of security, including fraud, legal issues, school security, and white collar crime. And more are added every day. @ Check out "Beyond Print" on the home page to find the links to this month's offerings, including:

Drugs and crime. Do harsher sanctions for low-level drug offenders contribute to an overall lower crime rate? Not according to a San Francisco-based think tank. It examined twelve of California's largest counties and compared those with strict enforcement policies that target low-level drug offenders to those that focus on more serious and chronic drug offenders. The authors found that counties that made fewer drug arrests and/or concentrated only on the worst drug offenses (manufacturing and trafficking) "had considerably more success in reducing crime" than did counties that combated drug abuse and crime problems by making more felony and misdemeanor drug arrests.

The authors explain that "simple possession drug offenses are not associated with high rates of crime... [so] increasing arrests for low-level drug possession does nothing to control crime and may drain resources away from more productive strategies."

The report, prepared by the Justice Policy Institute of the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, is on SM Online.

Book excerpts. Five types of computer crimes predominate: fraud by manipulation, forgery, damage or modification, unauthorized access, and unauthorized reproduction. Author Larry G. Nicholson breaks down these crimes with an eye toward investigations in a chapter from his book Security Investigations: A Professional's Guide (reviewed in September). The chapter, now available online, provides a brief overview and explanation of these crimes.

Another excerpt, from Shoplifters vs. Retailers: The Rights of Both (reviewed on October), discusses a scenario in which a teenage boy shoplifts a pen from a department store and security attempts to determine whether his friend assisted in the theft. An-other excerpt provides the customer's view and the loss prevention department's perspective of a case in which a mother takes candy from a store to assuage her crying children, then forgets to pay for it. Excerpts from both books are on SM Online.

Campus crime. Interested in knowing how many motor vehicle thefts took place on Northern Michigan University property between 1997 and 1999? How about the burglary trends at California State University-Long Beach? Crime statistics for colleges and universities throughout the United States can now be found at a new U.S. Department of Education Web site. The site lists all reported incidents of criminal homicide, manslaughter, sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, and arson. In addition, it includes data on arrests and disciplinary actions for liquor law violations, drug abuse violations, and weapons possession. SM Online has a link to the site.

Corruption. …

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