Krzysztof Wodiczko

By Baker, George | Artforum International, December 2000 | Go to article overview

Krzysztof Wodiczko


Baker, George, Artforum International


GALERIE LELONG

"Like you I have longed for a memory beyond consolation, for a memory of shadows and stones." These words (by Marguerite Duras) are delivered deadpan and lumbering by the female protagonist in the opening dialogue of Alain Resnais's 1959 film Hiroshima, Mon Amour. Seconds later, the film displays footage of a government building that stood at the epicenter of the Hiroshima nuclear catastrophe, the ravaged husk of which has been left standing, memorialized as the A-Bomb Dome. It was this structure that Krzysztof Wodiczko chose as the site for his Hiroshima Projection, 1999, a work commissioned by the Japanese city and documented in this exhibition.

The parameters of Wodiczko's projection were, as always, simple and direct: Onto a river embankment directly below the dome, he projected the videotaped testimony of a series of Hiroshima survivors, showing only the gesticulating hands of each participant. Immediately one thought of the parallels to be drawn between this strategy and the contemporaneous video of Silvia Kolbowski, An Inadequate History of Conceptual Art, 1998-99, which similarly seized on the hands of its participants as the visual component of a testimonial devoted to the troubled intersection of history and individual memory. The image of the hand is particularly suited to the contradictions of such a task, playing as it does on two diametrically opposed registers of the phenomenon of identification: According to a long-standing convention of propagandistic art, the hand evokes collective participation as a synecdoche for the human; and yet it simultaneously exceeds any such assimilation, looming here as singular and as fascinating as a fingerprint. The ever-shifting hands in The Hiroshima Projection seemed newly at tuned to such contradictions, replacing more anonymous, even cliched images from Wodiczko's past projections--the French-cuffed paw of male corporate power, for example, that proffered candle and gun on the facade of the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC (1988) or reached ambiguously in a pledge of allegiance on the AT&T Building, New York (1984). …

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