A Village with a Country Charm Huntley Grows Rapidly from Its Roots as a Dairy Farm Community

By Amato, Jonathan | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

A Village with a Country Charm Huntley Grows Rapidly from Its Roots as a Dairy Farm Community


Amato, Jonathan, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jonathan Amato Daily Herald Correspondent

- This is the first in a series about how our communities have changed during the last century. In coming weeks, Hampshire, Dundee Township, Algonquin, Lake in the Hills, Cary and Fox River Grove will be featured.

When the 20th Century opened, the town of Huntley was almost 50 years old. German immigrants mixed with people of English and Irish descent to make up the population of the village, which would grow and change as the decades of the century passed.

In 1900, it was still possible to talk with a veteran of the Civil War. Automobiles were still a newfangled invention, and the village of Huntley was a small farming community.

Community newspapers reported on who was visiting whom, who had gone into Elgin to go shopping, and which local residents were at home, sick.

National and international issues probably seemed far away from the small town in southeast McHenry County but would soon change the lives of town residents in more ways than one.

This is a journey back through the history of the 20th century in Huntley, taken decade by decade. Sources include recollections of town residents, newspaper accounts, and materials provided by the McHenry County Historical Museum and Huntley Public Library.

The '00s

The turn of the century saw Huntley solidify its position as one of the premier milk transport centers in the world.

In an article dated May 31, 1901, the Huntley Journal claimed that "Huntley is the largest milk shipping point in the world. A total of 1,200 cans - or 9,600 gallons - of milk is brought there every day. At an average of 90 cents per can, this would mean $1,080 per day, $32,400 per month and $388,000 per year."

Milk was brought into Huntley from surrounding dairy farms and processed at one of the plants in town. The milk then was shipped to Chicago on the Chicago-Northwest Railroad.

According to the late William "Pat" Williams of Huntley, farmers had to get up at 3 a.m. in order to get milk to the train by 7:30 a.m.

Dairy farming would continue to be an important part of the region for several decades to come.

Huntley residents also took time out to play. When the village tried to ban baseball on Sunday in 1906, Walter Farley, coach of the Huntley team and mayor of the village, led a march to the baseball diamond in protest.

The '10s

Huntley, as well as America, was introduced to the wider world when the United States entered World War I in April 1917.

Sixteen men answered the call to the colors from Huntley. The home front aided the soldiers in Europe through donations to organizations such as the Red Cross.

One serviceman, Harry Weltzien, was a motorcycle courier and had five motorcycles shot out from under him.

Huntley's mayor at the time, Henry Mackeben, encouraged donations by issuing a proclamation, part of which read, "May your pride in your township, your interest in humanity and your love for Old Glory, prompt you to give cheerfully and liberally. Let the heads of each family talk it over amongst themselves, settle how much they can conscientiously donate so that when the solicitors make their call, the business may be transacted with a minimum of effort."

The Victor Mey Company started to provide electricity to the village in 1913, although outlying farms would have to wait until the 1930s and '40s to get electricity.

The '20s

Huntley Consolidated Unit School District 158 was founded in 1920. As a result, one-room schoolhouses in Grafton Township were closed, and students were bused into Huntley.

The original buses were Model T Fords with wooden bodies and one long seat on each side. A high-school student drove.

Also in 1920, returning veterans founded American Legion Post 673. Dr. Oliver Statler was elected the post's first commander. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Village with a Country Charm Huntley Grows Rapidly from Its Roots as a Dairy Farm Community
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.