Artists Let Creativity Flow in Watercolor Guild

By Stewart, Laura | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Artists Let Creativity Flow in Watercolor Guild


Stewart, Laura, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Laura Stewart Daily Herald Staff Writer

An artist with a beret and a long cape, swirling about a tiny art studio might be something you would see in a movie scene.

But a cape and beret are not requirements for joining the Lakes Region Watercolor Guild.

All you need is to be "interested and curious" about painting with watercolors, said Kay Thomas of Highland Park, one of the guild's members.

The club is open to anyone in Lake County or elsewhere.

With its 60 members, the organization is the only group in the region that works strictly with watercolors, said Laini Zinn of Waukegan, the guild's president.

At monthly meetings, members are treated to critiques and demonstrations by various artists. They also take painting field trips together known as "paint-ins" or "paint-outs," depending on whether they are working indoors or outdoors.

One of the club member's barns has been a popular outdoor subject for the group to paint at "paint-outs."

Members also have access to a videotape library featuring famous watercolor works of art. Group members also display their paintings at community buildings throughout the year.

The organization is exhibiting some of its artwork through May 28 at the David Adler Cultural Center in Libertyville, 1700 N. Milwaukee Ave.

Some members have had a lifetime of painting experience, while others are just beginning their adventure.

Zinn does about 100 watercolor paintings a year, favoring subjects such as portraits, animals and landscapes.

For beginners, painting a simple object is a wise choice, Zinn said.

"You get in touch with your inner-self. You're free to express what feels like beauty," Zinn said. …

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