This Reader Doesn't Prize Naperville Coverage

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 10, 1999 | Go to article overview

This Reader Doesn't Prize Naperville Coverage


Byline: Denise Raleigh

I like to receive feedback.

I've been writing this column for a few years now and I've been lucky enough to hear from many people about topics I've written about.

I've heard from those who agree and those who disagree. I appreciate all of it.

I received an e-mail recently which did not reference any particular column, but it came after I praised Naperville Libraries Director Donna Dziedzic's response to the libraries winning a national award.

This reader, a Naperville resident, wanted to unload some feelings about Naperville and awards. Some of this reader's thoughts follow.

Generally: "..endless construction. Congestion, traffic, and uncontrolled development."

Schools: "The schools are always trying to prove how good they are, even though they are way too big, impersonal, and provide little individual attention (they resemble large corporations more than a caring school). My children rarely participate in anything because of the huge class sizes.

"Some teachers might be good, but the burden to really educate is with the parents, as we found out. We never saw a district try to legitimize itself as much as (Naperville Unit) District 203 - always applying for another phony award or distinction - what a joke!

"The fiasco with (Superintendent Donald) Weber typifies the overgrown bureaucracy of this monster. Obviously children are not the primary focus; PR and public opinion is!"

Attitude of Naperville residents: The reader took umbrage with Napervillians being arrogant over "phony awards" and "fake honors." The reader felt the city "pays" for these awards "to convince transient fools to keep moving in ... to this asphalt cancer."

About me and this newspaper: "For once, why don't you and your newspaper tell the truth about this plasticland? All we read is constant, phony blather that cost thousands of PR dollars to promote. (Perhaps you and your paper are on the payroll?)"

I've received negative letters before, but none have been quite this broad. I reread this reader's message quite a few times.

I am not on the payroll of either the city or school districts 202, 203 or 204.

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