Politics Is Part of the Process in Tri-Cities

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 3, 1999 | Go to article overview

Politics Is Part of the Process in Tri-Cities


Byline: Chris Cudworth

'Politics simply means the ongoing and constant art of persuasion we practice in order to get anything we want from this world.'

"Everything that's ever been done has been accomplished through politics, and everything that never got done was prevented through politics."

Those are the words of my longtime associate Fran Kaus, a part-time local political activist who owns his own business in Geneva, "Search For Excellence," a job-placement firm.

I called Fran as part of my survey of Tri-Cities residents about what the words "political" or "politics" mean because those words keep cropping up in topics of interest to the Tri-Cities. No one I've ever met took an earlier interest in politics than Fran Kaus. As teenagers, when most of us were into more traditional interests, Fran was studying national and international politics, and learning from it.

"Everything we do in life is political," Fran now maintains. "Just knowing someone is political, because we often need people to get what we want. That's certainly true when you're looking for a job.

"And remember how some kids in high school would cause all kinds of problems but never got into trouble? If you were in with the teachers, they liked you, and it was a political thing whether you were punished or not."

"Politics is both the saint and the devil," Fran asserts. "It enables and prevents us from doing what we want to do."

I also asked an attorney friend of mine, Greg Andrews of Wessels & Pautsch in St. Charles, to take a whack at explaining the word "political" - especially as it fits into our everyday lives:

"More often than not, I hear the word spoken with distaste," Andrews wrote. "As in, 'So and so got the job - it was all politics.' The way in which most everyone uses the word 'politics' seems to have drifted away from any neutral understanding so as to leave the word mired in a swamp of imagined, unseemly back-room deal making. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Politics Is Part of the Process in Tri-Cities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.