Writing Skills Put Woman into Home-Based Business

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 26, 1999 | Go to article overview

Writing Skills Put Woman into Home-Based Business


Byline: Kim Mikus

Becky Hoag is attracted to the written word and the art of portraying something concisely.

This attraction sparked the Batavia woman to open a new chapter of her career.

The 46-year-old woman started Hoag Communication, a home-based business offering a range of communications and public relations services to businesses and individuals in the Fox Valley.

She specializes in desktop publishing materials including brochures, newsletters and annual reports. Image development and advertising, logo design and media relations are other services she provides.

"I enjoy helping businesses get the word out," she said. Her goal is to develop cost-effective materials to promote business.

Hoag Communications caters to the small or medium-sized business that doesn't have a communications staff.

Hoag holds a great deal of experience in this industry. She recently completed 10 years with the Visiting Nurse Association of Fox Valley, where she served as director and then vice president of communications and development. Previously, she served as associate editor and writer for the former Fox Valley Living Magazine and public relations coordinator for Mercy Center in Aurora.

"I have a strong background in the not-for-profit world. Health care is also a strength," she said.

A graduate of Illinois Wesleyan University, Hoag started her career at North Central College in Naperville, working for nearly 10 years in the alumni and development office.

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