Dinosaur Hunter Shaking Things Up Lisle Paleontologist Makes Key Finds

By Stevens, Susan | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 27, 1999 | Go to article overview

Dinosaur Hunter Shaking Things Up Lisle Paleontologist Makes Key Finds


Stevens, Susan, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Susan Stevens Daily Herald Staff Writer

As a paleontologist, Michael Parrish recognizes the constant threat of having his foundations rumble.

Sometimes he does it to himself.

Earlier this year, Parrish and a colleague published a report challenging the traditional swanlike neck posture of the giant apatosaurus.

And this month, he and other researchers published their discovery of a jawbone fragment that pushes the age of modern mammals back 25 million years.

"I think it's the same thing that appeals to archeologists and treasure hunters: the possibility of finding something that's never been seen before," Parrish said. "It's quite exciting."

Parrish, of Lisle, is a professor and chair of the biology department at Northern Illinois University in Dekalb, which he says is ratcheting up a strong record of important finds in paleontology and archaeology among its faculty.

Parrish counts himself among paleontologists who became enraptured with toy dinosaurs as children. He renewed his interest in the 1970s, when he was a student at the University of California at Santa Cruz, followed by graduate work at the University of Chicago. He has been at Northern since 1989.

Despite media portrayals of exotic expeditions and fame, the profession is hardly glamorous.

"What you see on TV doesn't compensate for the time you spend looking at the ground," Parrish said. "Even the lab work is arduous."

Arduous.

And tedious.

The latest find, a new mouse-like mammal species called "ambondro mahabo" was picked out under a microscope by Field Museum volunteers sifting through 50 pounds of gravel, grain by grit.

The dirt was collected during a 1996 trip to Madagascar by Parrish, Field Museum geology chair John Flynn and other scientists. They visited a region that spans nearly the entire age of dinosaurs, 250 million to 70 million years ago.

"There's almost the same range in North America, but it tends to be in different regions," Parrish said. "What's unusual about this is it's all in one sedentary basin."

Using local accounts of dinosaur bones and geological and satellite maps, paleontologists located a site rich in small fossils. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dinosaur Hunter Shaking Things Up Lisle Paleontologist Makes Key Finds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.