Libraries Rekindle Teens' Interest in Books

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 25, 1998 | Go to article overview

Libraries Rekindle Teens' Interest in Books


Byline: Allison Wheeler

Libraries throughout the country joined together this past week to sponsor the first national Teen Read Week.

Starting last Monday and running through today, Lake County libraries have been participating in many activities to turn on teens to reading for enjoyment.

"Libraries have long recognized that the teen years are a time when many kids reject reading as just another dreary assignment," said Allen Meyer, director at Vernon Area Public Library in Lincolnshire. "Our goal is not only to remind teens that reading is important, it's fun. It's free. We also want to support parents and other adult efforts that encourage teen reading."

Vernon Area Public Library has been spreading the word that teens should read for the "fun of it." Throughout the week, the library asked high school freshmen through seniors their opinions about their favorite books. The library will tally the responses and then compile the scores into three Top Ten lists.

The lists will be printed on bookmarks so they will be entertaining and useful. The three lists will contain the Top Ten books the teens want their friends to read, the Top Ten books they want their parents to read and the Top Ten list of books by Vernon Area Public Library teenage readers. For teens interested in voicing their literature recommendations, today is the final chance.

Along with Teen Read Week, Vernon Area Public Library also hosted activities for young readers. Sixth- through ninth-graders were invited Oct. 19 to meet Jessica Carleton, a 15-year-old storyteller from Glenview. She told stories and also read from her own work in the library's Teen Cafe.

Carleton was the 1998 regional winner of the national Storytelling Youth Olympics and won the Liar's Contest at the Illinois Storytelling Festival twice for her tall tales.

"Jessica makes stories come alive through her animated delivery, and because of her age, she provides an excellent role model for younger children," Meyer said. …

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Libraries Rekindle Teens' Interest in Books
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