Catholic Tastes


JUDGE NOT ... Three theologians lost a lawsuit they had filed on behalf of Jesus Christ in a Munich, Germany court against both the Roman Catholic Church and Protestant churches. The plaintiffs took the churches to court for bringing Christ's name into disrepute. According to Reuters (May 25, 2000), the theologians, who called themselves "brothers in Spirit" of Christ, sued under a law that lets people defend their dead relatives' reputations. They argued that the churches' "bloody history," particularly their role in wars, made their calling themselves Christian "a fraud."

The judge dismissed the case, ruling that it would infringe upon the country's constitutionally guaranteed religious freedom. He also argued that, since Christians believe Christ rose from the dead, his "brothers" had no right to bring a case on his behalf.

EXORCISM JOKE

When the topic of exorcisms surfaced in the news again recently, we received the following joke via an anonymous e-mail.

"Question: What happens when you don't pay your exorcist?"

"Answer: You get repossessed."

FLOWER POWER "One of my colleagues recently moved into a new parish," writes the Tablet's columnist Pastor Ignotus (Sept. 2, 2000). "On his first day, he went into the church to have a look and saw two vases of flowers standing on the altar. Thinking that they looked a little awkward, he put them down on the floor.

"A few months later (months, not days) he went to his first local deanery conference. He introduced himself to another priest as the new man at St. Mary's. `Ah, you're the one that moved the flowers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Catholic Tastes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.