Happy Leader, Happy Nation: Whether George W. Bush Loves His Work May Make the Difference between One Term or Two

By Quindlen, Anna | Newsweek, January 15, 2001 | Go to article overview

Happy Leader, Happy Nation: Whether George W. Bush Loves His Work May Make the Difference between One Term or Two


Quindlen, Anna, Newsweek


Beneath the military blue tent that the Big Apple Circus pitches each holiday season in New York City labors a man named Serge Percelly, who juggles tennis racquets. Like other feats that seem both hugely difficult and absolutely pointless--contortionism, for example, or Steven Seagal movies--the first response to this one is "why?" But skepticism withers in the face, not of Mr. Percelly's skill, which is considerable, but of his affect, which is incandescent and irresistible. Two racquets spin, three, four, five, and the curve of the paddle is echoed in the arc of his delighted grin. There is nothing so grand in all the world as watching a person who loves what he does do it.

Which brings us to George W. Bush.

Some transition, huh? Which is probably what the Republicans are saying right about now.

But here's my theory: that the nation is happiest when its leader is obviously happy in his work. Oh, I know happiness has gone out of style, replaced by empowerment and self-esteem. But seeing, in the center ring of the political circus, a person who appears to have a job he loves with all his heart is bracing, even uplifting, for the country as a whole, in a fashion sub rosa, subconscious, but substantial. We know this from experience.

In the last 25 years the country has had two presidents who adored the job, but for quite different reasons. When right-wing operatives torture themselves with how Bill Clinton managed to beat the rap, they might consider the sheer pleasure of observing someone with the glow of knowing he knows everything. The policy wonk's policy wonk, he could rattle off the details of the welfare rolls in Alabama, the acreage in the national forests, the effect of the Asian markets on the eurodollar. And he could spit it all back in a speech that seemed to be coming straight at you, with a studied sincerity hypnotic as a snake charmer's song. That's one reason that, despite his personal behavior, his approval rating stayed high.

Ronald Reagan loved being president, too. It was the lead role, and the former actor was happy to play it that way, leaving the micromanaging to the cadre of supporting smart guys who stayed at their desks while he took the podium. When, on their anniversary, Reagan sent Nancy a homemade proclamation--"As Pres. Of the U.S., it is my honor & privilege to cite you for service above and beyond the call of duty in that you have made one man (me) the most happy man in the world for 29 years"--it was not only the action of a man who was wild about his wife but also wild about his position. The power, the pomp, the incredible, indubitable fact: I rule! Reagan exuded the confidence, not of intellect, but pride of place. That's one reason that, despite his disastrous policies, his popularity was huge.

By contrast Jimmy Carter, a man of principle and not of politics, made the presidency seem like the Stations of the Cross, his burden to bear. George Bush the elder often had the pinched look of the dyspeptic, perhaps because he thought he was inheriting morning in America and instead wound up with nightfall on Wall Street. …

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