Golden Apple Winner Finds Teaching Teachers Rewarding

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 23, 1998 | Go to article overview

Golden Apple Winner Finds Teaching Teachers Rewarding


Byline: Matthew Nickerson

When you've been declared the best, what do you do for an encore?

If you're Scott Iliff, you help make other people good, too.

In 1987, the Glenbard South High School science teacher won one of the first Golden Apples, the annual awards that recognize Illinois' best teachers.

Instead of resting on his laurels, Iliff has led a drive to beef up science education in elementary schools.

Last week and this week, he is helping conduct workshops at Benedictine University for elementary teachers on how to teach science.

Iliff, a 46-year-old Wheaton man who is nothing if not modest, doesn't think he is doing anything special.

He said most Golden Apple winners have done what he has done: kept teaching school and tried to help others.

"They're not self-promoters," he said. "They're into promoting their profession."

He has continued to teach at Glenbard South, and in the summer, he helps other teachers learn how to introduce problem-solving techniques into their classrooms.

He has watched workshop participants go on to win Golden Apples themselves.

"I'm not interested in retiring," he said. "I'm interested in what I'm doing."

Duo wins space award

Lake Park High School teachers Kelly Baugher and Fran Walthouse are out of this world.

The Roselle educators won the Spaceweek International competition earlier this month. The award comes with a $500 cash prize and a $3,000 watch.

The duo teaches a class called "algestry," which combines concepts from advance Algebra and chemistry. This year's course included a celebration of "Spaceweek," an event created to honor the link between space and society.

Baugher and Walthouse created several activities for the event, including a Jeopardy-style quiz show. They also had their students design lunar stations.

"The kids loved it," Baugher said. "They really got into it."

The week climaxed with egg drop. Students were given 10 sheets of plain paper, 26 centimeters of masking tape and five straws. The kids then had 45 minutes to create a landing pad for their unboiled ovum. …

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