Mind Games Teach Teens Lessons in Psychology

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 5, 1998 | Go to article overview
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Mind Games Teach Teens Lessons in Psychology


Byline: Mariam Ahmed

About 100 students from Wheaton Warrenville South High School recently put together a mental health fair.

The students worked for weeks in their psychology classes to assemble the booths that were set up in the gym.

Daryl Fitts and Jenne Dehmlow, the two psychology teachers who organized the fair, were very pleased with colorful and informational booths the students created.

"We do this psychology fair every other year. Eight psychology classes worked on this year's fair, and I am very impressed with the results," Fitts said.

All the gym classes were canceled for the day as Wheaton Warrenville South students roamed through the loud, color-strewn gymnasium, which was filled with music, confetti, balloons and posters.

Huddled underneath the festive atmosphere were numerous booths set up to collect data on psychological topics.

There were booths for schizophrenia, superstitions, meditation, dream interpretations, ESP, subliminal messages, phobias and short-term memory, among others.

Research was being done and data covertly collected by the psychology classes as students and teachers strolled through mazes, listened to blaring music, had their fortunes told and took various tests at the booths.

"I think the people who come to our booth are finding that a lot of the things that we are trying to prove are true," said senior Liz Riedel, whose group created a booth on the affects of color on the mind.

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