Big Ten Women Actually Get Fair Shake in Tourney

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 7, 1998 | Go to article overview

Big Ten Women Actually Get Fair Shake in Tourney


Byline: Patricia Babcock

College basketball coaches always seem to get a little edgy this time of year.

They'll get paranoid, sometimes acting as if the whole world is against them - or at least the entire NCAA Tournament selection committee.

That was certainly the case last week when the Big Ten women's basketball coaches gathered for their pre-conference tournament teleconference.

Sure, there was talk about the tournament and what it meant to the conference and how excited all the teams were to play under the bright lights of the RCA Dome in Indianapolis, but much of the hour was devoted to politicking and in some cases whining and complaining.

Seems that many Big Ten coaches feel the NCAA should place at least seven, and possibly eight, teams from the conference in the national tournament field. Anything less would be a slap in the face to the conference, its players and its coaches, they say.

Yet, at the same time, the coaches were skeptical that the league will get that many teams in because they're convinced that the Big Ten has been slighted by the national folks for years. And that this year will probably be no different when the NCAA selects its field of 64, which will be announced on Sunday (6:30 p.m., ESPN).

"I feel very strongly that the Big Ten continues to be overlooked nationally," said Northwestern coach Don Perrelli, who has received five NCAA Tournament bids since 1987.

"And we shouldn't be. We're one of the strongest conferences in the nation. I don't understand the committee and I never will. There's just this lack of respect for our conference on the national scene."

"Perrelli is absolutely right," chimed in Illinois coach Theresa Grentz, who took Illinois all the way to the Sweet Sixteen last year as the No. 4 seed. "I could tell you why that is, but you couldn't print it."

Now what in the world is going on? What has got these coaches so riled up? Is there really some kind of conspiracy going on here?

A look at last year's tournament field - in which Michigan State and Purdue got No. 8 seeds even though they were the league's tri-champions with Illinois - may raise a few eyebrows. But, overall, the Big Ten has fared pretty well in NCAA Tournament history.

In terms of total NCAA appearances since the first tournament in 1982, the Big Ten ranks third with 54 behind the Southeastern (94) and Atlantic Coast (63) conferences.

And, by the way, both the SEC and the ACC have demonstrated much more success in the tournament than the Big Ten has. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Big Ten Women Actually Get Fair Shake in Tourney
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.