Erecting Memorials to Crash Victims Is Part of Mourning

By Keeshan, Charles | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 7, 1998 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Erecting Memorials to Crash Victims Is Part of Mourning


Keeshan, Charles, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Charles Keeshan Daily Herald Staff Writer

Roadside memorials keep vigil to help remember loved ones

A memory can take on a life of its own.

It can be a candle lighted in a church, a pile of flowers dropped at the scene of a fatal accident or a note telling a deceased loved one he is missed.

This week it took the form of flowers, a cross and a sign along Route 72 in rural Dundee Township where a Sleepy Hollow teen died and four people were hurt in a three-car accident

Next week, it may be words painted on a water tower.

When a memorial is made up of flowers along a busy road, far be it from the Illinois Department of Transportation to pick it up and take the memory away.

Its employees will let the flowers wilt and the cardboard signs melt into the earth.

Those roadside memorials may look a mess, but they are important to the people who put them there, experts say.

It helps them grieve, heal and let other motorists know that at this point in the world, they lost someone they love.

In the days following last week's car crash that took the life of Sleepy Hollow teen Jared Page, two impromptu memorials have gone up near the accident scene along Route 72 west of Sleepy Hollow Road.

One, a cross adorned with roses and religious icons, sits on the north side of the highway in tribute to the 17-year-old Dundee-Crown High School student. The other, a sign along the south side, calls on motorists to remember the others injured in the Feb. 25 accident.

It is a scene repeated throughout the state wherever a fatal accident occurs. Grieving families and friends put up homemade signs, install crosses, lay photographs and place flowers at roadsides in memory of crash victims.

It is also a scene the Illinois Department of Transportation would rather not see.

"From a practical standpoint, we don't want them out there," IDOT traffic manager Terry Rammacher said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Erecting Memorials to Crash Victims Is Part of Mourning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?