Students Find Time to Squeeze in Recreational Reading

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 18, 1998 | Go to article overview

Students Find Time to Squeeze in Recreational Reading


Byline: Rachel Boller

With so many activities to choose from, Bartlett High School students are kept very busy. Extracurricular programs, sports and friends - as well as homework assignments - leave little time for much else.

I really started to wonder if people have "leisure activity time." I also wanted to know if any time is spent reading outside of school as a leisure activity.

Two weeks ago, I conducted a survey throughout several English classes. Results showed that out of 160 students surveyed, 24 students considered themselves to be slow readers, 58 considered themselves to be average readers, 37 considered themselves to be fast-paced readers, and seven felt they were somewhere in between. (Some students chose not to answer the question.)

Students reported to be reading 0-50 books per year, with most of them averaging two to 10 books per year.

The types of books students said they enjoy were mysteries first, then science fiction, romance, thrillers/suspense, fiction, adventures, historical fiction, religious tales, non-fiction, horror, murders, comedies and the list goes on.

Fifty-five students said they did not follow a series, although 33 of them did. Favorite series included "Star Wars," "Chicken Soup for the Soul," "Sweet Valley High," "Wayside School," Sherlock Holmes and the Hardy Boys.

Favorite authors included R.L. Stine, Stephen King, Michael Crichton, L.J. Smith, Mercedes Lackey, Mary Higgins Clark, Danielle Steel, Anne Rice, Christopher Pike, Alice Hoffman, Gary Paulsen and more.

Some students were more interested in reading newspapers. The favorite newspaper read by Bartlett High students was the Daily Herald. Other favorites included, secondly, the Chicago Tribune, the Sun Times, the Bartlett Examiner and the Courier News.

Students' favorite sections were the sports and the comics, although many enjoyed reading the front page, the arts, the neighborhood section, the editorials, the classifieds and the police reports. A few even named the obituaries.

Choice magazines were Seventeen, Teen, YM, Sports Illustrated, People, Snowboarder, Reader's Digest, Gamepro, Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, Circus, Hit Parader, Computer Gaming and Motor Trends.

Types of articles read by students ranged from teens' issues/crisis, true life stories, celebrities' lives, the "Why Me? …

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Students Find Time to Squeeze in Recreational Reading
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