Counselor Feels Blessed to Know Gifted Kids

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 25, 1998 | Go to article overview

Counselor Feels Blessed to Know Gifted Kids


A veteran District 214 staff member of 30 years, John Hersey High School guidance counselor Linda Kleinschmidt has worked with students identified as "academically gifted" since 1984.

Counseling kids who are chronically over-extended due to their intellectual curiosity, sense of accomplishment and drive, Kleinschmidt is the calming influence who helps them learn to prioritize and pare down their lists of "must-do" activities. These kids are typically sleep-deprived, taking all the Advance Placement courses they can manage while trying to fit in all the co-curriculars that interest them. She helps them face their hard choices, acting as a neutral observer, looking at the big picture of high school life.

As a guidance counselor, Kleinschmidt has heard it all, from the most complex problems to the most extraordinary excuses. For the gifted, life is as exciting, unexpected, funny and tragic as for anyone else. Sometimes it just seems that everything is a bit more intense for these high achievers.

Kleinschmidt's days are carefully planned with appointments and meetings, but an unexpected crisis or event can throw her schedule out the window at any time. Described by colleagues as "warm and friendly," she makes herself available to all students, creatively suggesting options in problem-solving.

According to Robert Morgan, Hersey's assistant principal for student services, Kleinschmidt challenges students to take courses that make them stretch academically and writes informative, heartfelt letters of recommendation to colleges on their behalf. She really knows her counselees and is able to give a true, comprehensive account of their abilities and potential.

"I have been truly blessed to know some of the most talented individuals and supportive families in District 214," smiles Kleinschmidt.

She has had the opportunity to meet at least two or three Hersey students who are children of '70s graduates of the school.

"Seeing a second generation of Huskies from the same family become successful young adults is an incredible experience," she says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Counselor Feels Blessed to Know Gifted Kids
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.