Cost-Effectiveness Determines Material Used on Roads

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 23, 1997 | Go to article overview

Cost-Effectiveness Determines Material Used on Roads


The Daily Herald continues its weekly report featuring answers to your questions about traffic problems and road construction.

Q. I have a general question on road building that I see in our area. Sometimes I see roads built with pure concrete and no blacktop and sometimes I see roads repaired with concrete and blacktop. My question is what is the difference? Is the blacktop just for residential areas or does it have to do with a heavier truck load?

- J.R., Elk Grove Village

A. The decision whether or not to use asphalt with concrete is based on a number of issues, Illinois Department of Transportation officials say.

Truck traffic can be a factor, but so can economics.

For instance, concrete "becomes more cost-effective on a larger job," said Mark Reznicek, who is in charge of pavement designs for IDOT.

Also, concrete is preferable for roadways with a high rate of truck traffic because it's sturdier, Reznicek said.

"Bituminous (another name for asphalt) tends to rut when you have heavier traffic," Reznicek said.

Asphalt will usually be poured over concrete "when it's served its life and you have a lot of cracking typically 20 years later."

Because of the heavy volume of truck traffic in the Chicago area, IDOT usually pours asphalt over ailing concrete. But elsewhere in the state where there is less truck traffic, IDOT will lay concrete over concrete because it is less expensive, Reznicek said.

IDOT began in the road business in the 1920s, when the agency inherited all of the state's concrete roads, said Les Aling, a maintenance operations engineer for IDOT.

"Ever since then we've usually built concrete roads," Aling said.

Q. I have a question about traffic overflow from a main street onto a residential street here in Arlington Heights. I live on the 1700 block of Windsor Drive - the section of Windsor south of Palatine Road that used to connect to Rand Road but does not anymore. It has basically become the huge morning and evening fast track around the Palatine/Rand Road intersection. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cost-Effectiveness Determines Material Used on Roads
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.