Librarians No Longer Keeping Talents Quiet

By Allen, Kari | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 24, 1997 | Go to article overview

Librarians No Longer Keeping Talents Quiet


Allen, Kari, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Kari Allen Daily Herald Staff Writer

FYI ...

What: Lyric Opera program

When: 7:30 p.m. today

Where: Nichols Library, 200 W. Jefferson Ave., Naperville

Who: Presented by Naperville librarians

Cost: Free

For details: Call Susan Greenwood at (630) 961-4100, ext. 365

Mary Juzenas spends her days in the quiet atmosphere of the Naperville Public Libraries.

Her hours are filled with the soft turning of pages, frequent tapping of keys on computers and an occasional whisper.

But her nights and weekends are something else entirely.

At those times, Juzenas, who has worked for the libraries for the past 10 years, focuses on opera. In fact, she says she's been a singer since she first opened her mouth.

And she's not alone.

Several Naperville librarians are musicians or vocalists in their spare time.

They're not planning to keep these talents hidden, either. They're revealing their secrets at 7:30 p.m. today in the Community Room of the Nichols Library, 200 W. Jefferson Ave.

The group will present several arias and commentaries about the 1997-98 Lyric Opera Season. The Lyric Opera performs annually in Chicago, but not much is usually done to celebrate opera in Naperville, Juzenas said.

An Aurora resident, Juzenas points out that the Aurora Public Libraries are presenting a Lyric Opera program this year. But an actual performance by librarians is something quite rare.

Yet tonight's program doesn't seem odd to the Naperville staff, considering the number of musicians who work here, Juzenas said.

Sue Fielder, head of the Audio Visual Department, and Constance Strait, head of the Technical Services Department, came up with the idea for the program, Juzenas said. Both will offer commentary at tonight's presentation.

Juzenas, a coloratura soprano, will sing two arias, one from "La Boheme," the other from "Marriage of Figaro." Fielder described a coloratura soprano as "the highest, most acrobatic soprano."

Juzenas will be accompanied by concert pianist Lakshmi Kapoor, a music librarian. Juzenas has performed in various operas all over the country, from Chicago's Orchestra Hall to New York's Carnegie Hall. …

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